Oh the Woes of the Rich

30/01/2019

The Sydney Morning Herald put out an article today that decried the overly high school fees parents had to pay at the start of the school year. And they aren’t wrong – cuts to education, the expectation of new uniforms, the buying of resources like books, etc. all adds up and every year the fees just grow. But there is one problem with the article that is so outrageous it begs the question why it was written. Because the family the SMH focused on and felt sorry for was one jumping into private schools.

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We Can All Learn From Today

30/11/2018

Today, tens of thousands of students, children, went on a strike from school today across the country. All of them did so with one united goal – to protest against the current government’s outdated reliance on fossil fuels, for the survival of their futures. Even being faced with displeased politicians hiding behind the walls of Parliament, they shouted for a better and cleaner world.

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Dark Emu: A Reflection

05/11/2018

A longer read than usual.

Engrossed by a history I had no (substantial) prior knowledge of, I put aside my usual leisurely reading pace to complete Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe, an Aboriginal writer. Published in 2014, I first heard of the book on an ABC comments thread on Facebook in 2017. The post was about Indigenous representation (I cannot recall the context), and I asked, out of genuine interest, what sources would be worth referring to so I could learn more. I got a few responses, with recurring mention of Dark Emu. I never ended up buying the book online, as I usually would, and I soon forgot about it. That is, until I found it in a bookstore earlier this year. I remembered the suggestion and bought it without hesitation. Although lost in the endless data of the internet, I would like to offer thanks to whoever brought it to my attention.

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Tony Said the “I” Word

03/11/2018

In a farcical appointment, Tony Abbott, a former Prime Minister (also a farcical position for him), has become the Indigenous Envoy. A man with such a foul reputation in any issue that requires compassion or some semblance of knowledge, this role was destined to be a train wreck; if nothing else, he provides some comic relief, albeit at the expense of those he presides over. His most recent scandal? He said the “I” word: invasion.

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