Australia Owes Timor-Leste Reparations

16/06/2019

I have written before about the shameful way in which Australia (and the US and Indonesia by extension) has treated the young country to our northwest. Our support of the Indonesian dictator Suharto, involvement in forming the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) (and subsequent withdrawal in 2002), and the espionage we committed against Timor-Leste during negotiations have all had massive consequences.

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Time to Rethink ANZUS?

13/06/2019

Since the election of Donald Trump, there have been two main approaches in Australia regarding our relationship with the US. The first is backing away from them entirely and reconsidering how we interact with an increasingly erratic global superpower, and the other is the argument whereby all of Australia will be prone to imminent security risks should we so much as cough without American protection. One aspect of this is discussing how relevant the ANZUS Treaty is.

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The “National Security/Interest” Myth

10/06/2019

As the last couple of weeks have been quite busy with university assessments, admittedly the frequency of my posts here has dropped considerably. Equally as regrettable, or perhaps worse, is the lack of time I’ve set aside to read the books I have literally piled around me. So this week I plan on getting back into the swing of things to catch up on the missed days. The big news this week is the AFP raids, but how much does ‘national security’ really play into this?

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The Coalition’s Personal Attack Dog

07/06/2019

The AFP raids on journalism this week have brought widespread criticism from much of the media (including News Corp), the Unions, GetUp!, and even the international press, like the New York Times. I found the NYT comment about Australia being the most ‘secretive democracy’ rather funny – it inadvertently implies that the US is not a democracy. But this is not the first time the AFP has been used as a political tool, and that should concern everyone.

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Australia’s “Inauthentic Opposition”

06/06/2019

For a number of decades now, the Democrats in the US have been referred to, along with the Republicans, as ‘neoliberal’, ever plodding along to the ‘right’ to slowly normalise the inequalities that plague Americans each day, and which was one factor that led to Trump’s successful election. The term “inauthentic opposition” has been used to describe this slow but obedient drift, which most certainly leaves many people disillusioned about how their system works, when the flawed two-party system functions as one corporate body. Here in Australia, the Labor Party is definitely earning themselves this abysmal title.

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The Precedent Is Set, Again

05/06/2019

The AFP have been used as political tools before, notably when raiding Union offices with a media entourage and shady Minister that tried to hide from her blatant abuse of power. Now, this week, the AFP have raided the home of a News Corps journalist and the ABC for chilling reasons. Both of them are related to ‘national security’. Shout out to Assange, who our government has abandoned completely.

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What Australia Can Look Forward To

29/05/2019

Having elected the Coalition in for another three years really helps solidify who I am as a person; that is, a contradiction. Visions of an ideal society collide with the cynical prediction of the destruction of organised human life (to borrow Chomsky’s phrase). The non-confrontational pacifist who is ever ready to vehemently argue their point with anyone who challenges it. The student who understands they know very little, yet denounces the unaware masses for their ignorance. The line between these two sides only continues to blur the more our leaders sink the world lower and lower into their pit of corruption and negligence. Buckle up, Australia.

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WikiLeaks and Whistleblowers: Attacks on Press Freedom

27/05/2019

Julian Assange has now been charged under the US’ Espionage Act, potentially facing over 170 years in prison and being the first person to be charged under this Act for merely publishing material leaked to WikiLeaks. A number of whistleblowers have faced this charge, from Daniel Ellsberg (who leaked the Pentagon Papers) to Daniel Hale (who revealed the assassination and drone programs implemented by Obama). But where is the media outrage? The public interest?

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Australia Votes

17/05/2019

At the bottom of this piece I have linked many of my previous pieces about the lead up to the 2019 Federal election for people to look back on and consider. Looking back on the last few months, discussions I have had with a variety of people have been rather varied. Arguing ‘death taxes’ and the union movement with a One Nation sympathiser, the decriminalisation of currently illicit drugs with a strict no-drugs friend, the rights of workers with a swing voter turned Labor supporter, healthcare and women’s rights with a student midwife. These are but a few of the issues that Australia are taking to the voting booths tomorrow – and the top of the list is climate change.

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China’s Surveillance A Dark Mirror of Our Own

06/05/2019

A few days ago, Human Rights Watch released a report about China’s extensive and quite Orwellian surveillance program, rolled out in the Xinjiang region. Through an app accessible by police and authorised government officials, incredible amounts of data on any given person is collected and stored to be monitored. 1984 plays out like a textbook in China, but what about the West? Here it’s like a play with the curtains closed.

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