UK Election: Vote Labour

23/11/2019

The Labour Party, under Jeremy Corbyn, could have a real chance to defeat the Conservatives. I don’t know all that much about UK politics, so I don’t know what third parties or alternatives there may be, but Corbyn’s Labour Party, whether you love the man or not, is undeniably better than giving the Conservatives under Boris Johnson another term to screw up the UK and Brexit negotiations.

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Reflecting on Old Reflections: Lenin and the Russian Revolution

23/11/2019

Earlier this year, I read Lenin and the Russian Revolution by Christopher Hill, which was a rather old and small book that is very much an introduction to the revolution and to Lenin himself. At the time I also wrote a couple of pieces on my thoughts about it, thoughts which, with further reading and understanding, are worth revisiting in an exercise of revision. While the general thrust of each of the pieces is still solid, my view of Lenin has changed drastically – for the worse.

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Journalism as A Pillar of Democracy

About a month ago I had a take home exam/essay for my Political Communication unit at university. Now that I have gotten the marks back for them – I can happily say I got 100% for it all, as the guy that ran the unit was really impressed and even praised the fact I challenged some of the concepts and ideas – I thought I would post them all here in a string of short pieces without fear of TurnItIn flagging me for plagiarising my own content. I’ll quote the questions we were given and then have what I wrote underneath – there will be six in total. This one details some of the ways in which I don’t think journalism lives up to its role as a ‘key pillar’ of democracy.

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Capitalism Hasn’t Changed

09/11/2019

I’ve recently started reading The ABC of Anarchism (originally Now and After and What Is Communist Anarchism) by Alexander Berkman, and while a lot of the references made do show the age of the book, published in 1929, there are still many relevant observations and similarities to the modern age. The main one, with its many facets, is that capitalism hasn’t really changed much over the years, other than finding more efficient methods of concentrating even more wealth into fewer hands.

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Brexit Will Never End: What About a Global Community Instead?

20/10/2019

The Brexit farce that has ensnared the UK for over three years is coming to yet another apparent deadline, which doesn’t really mean much because no matter what the results of Johnson’s new miracle deal turn out to be, it won’t end there. In the EU or not, Brexit will shape the political and societal future of the UK for many years to come.

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Politics and Human Rights Are Not Markets

07/10/2019

I haven’t posted much recently (except for the 1-year piece) because I spent a week visiting a close friend interstate. While it wasn’t my intention to be inactive and not write, it was good to take a break, and it let me have time to read and actually finish reading a book and get back into another university reading, Introduction to Political Communication by Brian McNair. After reading the chapter on political advertising, my stance only consolidates – political advertising should not exist.

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I Support Impeachment, But Not Like This

26/09/2019

Trump has been caught trying to get dirt on potential Democratic rival Joe Biden and his son, Hunter, through the Ukrainian government. This, for whatever reason, has thrown Pelosi into action – impeachment is now an acceptable move, unlike… when exactly was it not acceptable? Is this really the excuse they’re going to use to try and drag the cult leader of the Republican Party down?

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“Left”? What “Left”?

25/09/2019

Readers who have been on this site before may know I am not a fan of the ‘left vs right’ dynamic that is used to divide public opinion over irrelevant concerns, mostly because they are extremely subjective. Specifically, no one can tell whether it refers to social or economic policies, and many people who use the economic factors to label things often get it entirely wrong.

But let’s pretend the terms have meaning for a moment.

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On Discourse: Climate Change

24/09/2019

I recently joined a student led and run Facebook group for my university (it’s mostly a “shitposting” forum with some decent posts and gems hidden inside). This coincided with the climate strike last Friday, and so there was a lot of buzz about the protest in the city. While I am all for free speech and even enjoy a worthy shitpost (including those against the strikes), it was the occasional disinformation and vitriol that caught my eye.

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Middle East on Edge

16/09/2019

Israel has an election coming up, after the shenanigans that occurred earlier this year, and as such have been increasing tensions in both Gaza and the West Bank. An attack on an oil supply in Saudi Arabia, allegedly carried out by the Houthis, has set the US on yet another rampage of rhetoric towards Iran. 18 years after 9/11, the US has done nothing but destroy any chances for peace that have arisen.

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