MUKGA?

26/07/2019

Make the UK great again – it doesn’t quite have the same ring to it as MAGA. But, new PM Boris Johnson is keen to channel his inner Trump populism by promising this elusive greatness. Perhaps they can find it behind all of those austerity measures… or in the biscuit tin of a racist grandma…

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Is the Invasion of Iran Confirmed?

24/07/2019

With the ascension of yet another Western example of absolute buffoonery – yes, I mean Boris Johnson in the UK – the question of an invasion of Iran becomes even more troubling. Tensions have been rising between the US and Iran’s regime, an escalation one can hold the US solely responsible for, but which Iran has acted increasingly authoritarian in response to (it’s almost like there are similarities with the situation in Venezuela, where the US tries to stir civil unrest to ‘justify’ toppling governments…). So why is the UK leadership important?

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Healthcare Is A Right – Private Insurers Need to Back Off

24/07/2019

Yesterday, NIB boss (Mark Fitzgibbon) said that the government should scrap Medicare. Not a surprising call from the head of a private health insurance company, and one that has been slowly in the works for the last few years anyway. But such a blatant attack on our public healthcare system is exactly why we should not be abolishing it.

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Revising History the Right Way

23/07/2019

The idea of historical revisionism is something that is brought up a lot, by everyone, for many different reasons. When you hear the phrase ‘rewriting history’, it tends to conjure up murky and Orwellian imagery, a world where fact is replaced with a manufactured conception of the past. To the contrary, I would argue that historical revisionism should be encouraged – so long as it is done correctly.

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Consumerism Vs Participation in Politics: The Silent Majority Exists

20/07/2019

For an upcoming university unit, I have two books as prescribed core reading: An Introduction to Political Communication by Brian McNair, and Reporting Elections: Rethinking the Logic of Campaign Coverage by Stephen Cushion and Richard Thomas. While I have, I’d say, a reasonable knowledge and understanding (as well as some strong opinions) on those topics – I have, obviously, written (much less professionally) on them myself – it’s always enlightening to read more about the things you think you know. Even if many of the conclusions match previous ones, the difference each time is perspective.

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Quick Quips: What’ll We Lose First, Money or Sanity?

15/07/2019

  • As if anyone cared what her opinion was, Pauline Hanson has pitched in on the Uluru climbing debate. She doesn’t see the ‘cultural sensitivity’ seeing as people ‘have been climbing’ it for years. Reality check – yes, it has been a culturally sensitive issue all those years too, but finally Indigenous voices are being listened to. Just don’t climb Uluru – it’s that simple.
  • Can the media please stop asking Hanson what she thinks?
  • For Australians talking about ‘raiding Area 51’, we have a perfectly good US intelligence base near Alice Springs that could do with some dismantling.

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Democracy for Sale: Donations

14/07/2019

It is the unfortunate truth that nowhere in the world has democracy been properly and fully implemented, and that under the current system it is unlikely that it ever will. Even in the apparent birthplace of democracy – Ancient Greece – participation was limited to very strict demographics. Today in Australia, while things have improved on the participation front – although some demographics, such as prisoners, are unable to vote, and the debate about dropping the voting age to 16 continues – true democracy eludes us. As it turns out, you can just buy it.

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Be Sceptical, But Be Sensible

11/07/2019

In the past week or so, I’ve watched a few videos and read a few articles about flat earth theories, climate change denial, and other assorted ‘conspiracies’ that are out there. In the vast majority of cases, scepticism is something I would encourage, but are there limits to that? Is it healthy scepticism to question something that can easily be proven, and has been proven multiple times? If done right, then sure.

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Harris, Biden, and Israel

09/07/2019

Biden is clearly the corporate and ‘normal’ choice for the Democratic nomination in the US, but there has also been much focus on Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren. Specifically, Harris attacked Biden regarding his close ties with segregationists and his record on busing. She appears to be gaining momentum in the debates and national conversation, but there is a touch of hypocrisy behind the campaign.

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Australia Could Learn from Costa Rica

08/07/2019

When I think of Latin America, the first thing that comes to mind is the political turmoil infecting most of the continent. That’s a large step away from many of the people I know who would say they’ve never heard of Nicaragua, or my brothers who know Peru because they’re big fans of llamas. But it’s the small country between Nicaragua and Panama, surprisingly devoid of most of their neighbours’ strife, that all of us could learn a few things from – Costa Rica.

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