Banerji and the Threat to Free Speech

14/08/2019

The High Court has ruled that Michaela Banerji’s sacking from the (then) Department of Immigration and Border Protection – Home Affairs sounds much nicer for the PR – was legitimate. This ruling has (to borrow the frequently used phrase from everywhere) rather chilling effects for democracy and free speech, and also has implications for other areas as well.

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Quick Quips: To Protest Is Your Right

01/08/2019

Nothing that benefitted any oppressed or supressed demographic was gained by doing nothing. Every major movement of the last century or so, from the black rights’ movement to the #MeToo movement, Union actions to revolts against autocratic governments, environmental and anti-war causes – all of these have involved some form of protest.

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Not to Say, “I Told You So”, But…

28/07/2019

… I told you so. It’s beyond the realm of predictive speculation – what the current government has done, or been tangled up in, has been blatantly obvious since the beginning. If people paid any attention or read into policies and the like, maybe they wouldn’t be so dismayed and shocked when certain stories break in the media. Although granted, the media is half to blame for most of this ignorance. There are countless examples that could be used, but here are four (mostly from this month).

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Australia Could Learn from Costa Rica

08/07/2019

When I think of Latin America, the first thing that comes to mind is the political turmoil infecting most of the continent. That’s a large step away from many of the people I know who would say they’ve never heard of Nicaragua, or my brothers who know Peru because they’re big fans of llamas. But it’s the small country between Nicaragua and Panama, surprisingly devoid of most of their neighbours’ strife, that all of us could learn a few things from – Costa Rica.

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Quick Quips: What Is a Lie?

18/06/2019

The Economist posted a video a couple of months ago discussing whether or not politicians lie. I didn’t agree with most of it, seeing as their conclusion was that something was only a lie if the person telling it had the intent and knowledge they were doing so. They instead try to palm certain things off – even Trump’s antics – as things like ‘exaggeration’, ‘untruths’ (isn’t that just synonymous with lies?), ‘nonsense’, or (quoting the academic prowess of a philosopher) ‘bullshit’. How trite.

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Queensland Labor has Failed

14/06/2019

Coal. One of the major factors behind the Coalition’s re-election almost a month ago, as QLD and regional areas voted against sensible environmental policy to instead receive more propaganda from a failing government about a dying industry. Labor was never perfect on this issue, but they at least had a plan. But now Queensland Labor has put the final nail in the coffin – Adani edges closer and closer.

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Australia’s “Inauthentic Opposition”

06/06/2019

For a number of decades now, the Democrats in the US have been referred to, along with the Republicans, as ‘neoliberal’, ever plodding along to the ‘right’ to slowly normalise the inequalities that plague Americans each day, and which was one factor that led to Trump’s successful election. The term “inauthentic opposition” has been used to describe this slow but obedient drift, which most certainly leaves many people disillusioned about how their system works, when the flawed two-party system functions as one corporate body. Here in Australia, the Labor Party is definitely earning themselves this abysmal title.

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Labor Has A Choice

31/05/2019

After losing an ‘unlosable’ election (where have we heard that before?), Labor has a lot of choices to make, especially in regards to how they fared in Queensland. The only problem is, the issue that they need to consider is one that will lose and gain voter support no matter how they approach it – climate change.

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Can We Blame Queensland?

20/05/2019

As a Queenslander, my first response to that question would probably be a defensive retort – as a Greens voter it most certainly was not my fault these corporate con artists won again. But I am almost an anomaly here, the bluest state of our country, in one of the safest LNP seats in SEQ. While I can understand the vitriol being thrown at QLD, and don’t doubt there are some who can directly be blamed, this goes beyond what the individual voter can be accountable for.

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Too Much Complacency is Dangerous

16/05/2019

All too often I see and hear people who could not care less about the political aspect of life or the events of the world beyond their experiences. I do not necessarily begrudge these people, for many are my friends and I can see why certain things are considered ‘boring’ or of relatively little interest. But there comes a point where this lack of knowledge becomes troubling. Some people are unable to explain or understand simple things like how parties work (or even what parties there are) or how the voting system works (good, profanity filled video here on that). I do not begrudge these people, but the complacency is dangerous in our current world.

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