Married at First Sight: The Tragic Endgame of Commercial Media

21/02/2019

If there is one thing I hate more than the commercial news stations, it is the other garbage that they spew out year after year to boost ratings and make absolute bellends ‘famous’. Shows like Master Chef used to have a level of prestige, where the personality was important but second to the cooking ability of the contestants. After the first few seasons, however, it quickly became all about the personalities and drama, with the actual cooking taking passenger seat in a cooking show. Nowadays, these types of shows don’t even bother trying to hold substance and go straight for the ratings fix. No more is this evident than with the absolute depths of media depravity, Married at First Sight.

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Australian Game of Thrones

13/02/2019

A massive Game of Thrones fan friend of mine tagged me in a post shared by our local Federal MP, Andrew Laming. The original post was from a meme page that supported the National Party, and with the GoT poster background and font, they had photoshopped Bill Shorten onto it with the words “The Boats Are Coming”. Funny in a way, if entirely untrue, but as my friend pointed out, there are some relatively trivial but accurate comparisons between the show and real life.

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Calling Out AIPAC and Israel Is Not Anti-Semitic

12/02/2019

The notion that legitimate criticism of a lobbyist group and of Israel’s government is somehow anti-Semitic is absurd. Both the Democrats and the Republicans in the US, however, firmly believe this is the case, as does Israel. So much so that they have introduced laws in defence of Israel that actually restrict the actions of states to participate in any kind of boycott of Israel, laws that stifle freedoms in the land of the free.

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Lenin and the Russian Revolution: A Reflection Pt.2

06/02/2019

Nationalism and Imperialism

In part 1, I talked about the possibility of a socialist revolution taking place today. The chances are quite small in my view, and one of the reasons for that is the ideological divides and how people perceive different –isms. In this piece, I just want to touch on nationalism and imperialism, with reference to ideas of Lenin’s quoted in Christopher Hill’s Lenin and the Russian Revolution.

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Lenin and the Russian Revolution: A Reflection Pt.1

06/02/2019

Revolution

It took longer than I intended (it was a relatively short book), but I have finally finished Christopher Hill’s brief book on the Russian Revolution, which spoke of it through the lens of Lenin’s ideas and actions. I’ll most definitely have to read some other books about the time period to have a more in depth understanding and context surrounding the Revolution as it was rather limited. Despite this, it did offer a fair amount of introductory insight to the years (approximately) 1903-1924, and there are ideas worth exploring.

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Quick Quips: Bus to Where? The Front Fell Off

23/01/2019

Bill Shorten is trying to one up Scott Morrison after the Prime Minister failed to stay with his bus through Queensland a while back. After Pauline’s battler bus, Scott Morrison’s shadow bus, and Bill’s publicity bus, who is steering the country away from that cliff over there?

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500 Book Milestone

23/01/2019

It’s Bookfest this week and with what I purchased I tipped over the 500 books mark. That’s 500 books owned, not read, but they are all in the ever growing pile that I’ll get to someday. I believe the Japanese phrase I heard some time ago was “tsundoku”, the books that are collected but never read. So many books and nowhere near enough time…

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No Cure for Ignorance, Only Better Ignorance

10/01/2019

While I consider philosophy, history, and political books recreational reading, it is always refreshing to go back to the genre that introduced me to reading in the first place – fantasy. What better than the late Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels, containing equal parts humour, insightful quotes, and the only flat-earth theory that I would ever accept if such a thing were true. But it’s the middle one I wish to mention, as there was a specific quote from the third novel, Equal Rites (a great pun), about ignorance.

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What Is History?: A Reflection Pt.4

06/01/2019

History as a Means for Prejudice

As I come to the conclusion of What Is History? by E. H. Carr, I must highly recommend it as required reading for anyone interested in history in any sense of the word. An understanding of earlier thinkers, such as Marx, Hegel, Acton, etc. would be useful but is not necessary; I knew some of the references made, but Carr explains enough so as to not convolute his point with obscure names and ideas. For this piece, I lean back on an assertion made in the first piece and tie it with a topic Carr talks about in the final lecture of the book. This is that history is viewed by the historian (an individual) through the lens of the society he is a product of. This has positive and negative elements, but the isolation of subgroups of humanity (be it geographic, racial, etc.) is a negative that takes form when history is distorted through a prejudicial lens.

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What Is History?: A Reflection Pt.3

05/01/2019

History as a Method of Prediction

Again I loosely refer to the concepts introduced by Carr in his book What Is History?, but intend on using that as merely inspiration for my own thoughts on this topic and not as a recounting of his views. I’ve previously written about how history can be used as a comparative tool and as context to more succinctly understand current events (causation, which, coincidentally, is the chapter I am up to in Carr’s book). I have also written a few pieces predicting what I believe may happen in the near future based on the historical context of the region. There are also moral and factual aspects of these predictions that I believe are important, not because they have any bearing on the prediction itself, but on the person who made it and reason it was made.

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